Newsweek HR opportunity

ended 10. January 2022

A journalist at Newsweek.com is looking for comments from HRs and recruiters on how to resign from a job without burning bridges. Just a few quick lines will do as deadline is midday.
 



 

6 responses from the Newspage community

"Don't mentally 'check out', have your head in the game for your notice period. Support your employer by planning workload contingency and a handover. Act with integrity, deliver what you can and thank your team."
"It sounds obvious, but being transparent and honest when resigning is key to protecting the relationship you have with your employer. Given the modern world in which we live, your employer will sharply find out where you've gone, who you're working for, and even how much you're being paid, so there is little point in hiding anything from them. Dishonesty will leave a bitter taste in the mouth and will break any trust you've built up with them, so be honest about why you're leaving and who you're going to. They will respect you for it in the long run."
"The best advice I can give, is keep it simple and to the point. Start off with a formal notification of your intention to leave and then move onto the suggested leave date, making sure you are honouring your notice period. I would then always suggest thanking your employer, as this is a good note to leave on and will leave a civil and professional impression, hence not burning any bridges."
Be honest, but not too honest. If you have been doing regular reviews with your manager then they should know why you're leaving and it shouldn't be a shock. As small businesses, you may have to let talent go to get more experience but if you do it right they could come back to you. Finally, don't do it by text, phone or email - have a face to face conversation with your boss and talk to them. Show them the respect that you would like back."
Star Quote
"It really is a small world and you never know who you will end up working with again in the future. Keep your resignation letter short and sweet. If you want to share your reasons for leaving keep them positive. If you have feedback to offer, that may best be saved for the exit interview or a chat with your boss/HR. If you feel you can, it’s nice to thank your employer for the opportunities they’ve provided."
"When resigning you don't need to explain your reasons. Just say that you would like to resign and the date you would like to go, taking into account your contract of course. Simple."