Middle of the night anxiety - Metro

ended 27. October 2021

A journalist at the Metro is looking for sleep/mental health/wellbeing experts to give advice on 'How to deal with "middle of the night anxiety"'. She is particularly interested in practical tips/techniques/methods people can try if they struggle with anxiety during the night.

5 responses from the Newspage community

Star Quote
"The fastest way to reduce anxiety and regain a feeling of calm to facilitate sleep is through controlled breathing. Take a deep breath in through your nose for a count of 4 and out through your mouth for a count of 6. Repeat. If you are struggling to focus, look at a rectangular object, a book, a window, a phone and breathe in while you look across the short edge and out while you look across the long edge. The important thing is to breathe out for longer than you breathe in. This technique quietens the sympathetic nervous system and our fight or flight response and stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, slowing the heart rate and restoring a feeling of restfulness."
"There's nothing worse than waking up with your heart and mind racing. It all feels incredibly overwhelming but we need to convince our brains that we are safe and this can go a long way to helping. First, recognise that this is anxiety - name it and take away its power. Wiggle your toes and focus on the sensation of your duvet and sheets on your skin. Breathe in for 5, hold for 6, out for 7 and repeat, this kicks in the parasympathetic nervous system to counteract the adrenaline. Write down all your worries in a book (keep it by the side of your bed). By writing them down they are out of your mind and you can review them with a clear head in the morning. If it's a continuing issue then speak with your GP. Try to avoid sleeping tablets and instead look for ways to cope with anxiety." And last, but not least, interrupted sleep can also be a sign of stress and burnout during the day. Spend some time reviewing how busy your days are and look to factor in more rest time to allow your body to come back into balance.
As a person who struggles with anxiety and depression, I use an aromatherapy blend of neroli, rose and Roman chamomile on pulse points, they work together to promote a sense of calm and relaxation when it’s time for bed. It's absolutely fantastic and called "night time Remedies to Roll" by Neal's Yard Remedies.. I liked it so much, I now sell it in the salon to my clients.
Learn TRE - TRE is an amazing somatic self-help tool to de-stress the body - and that includes more resilience, less anxiety, also less pain, esp. psychosomatic pain! Learn more on www.tremendousTRE.co.uk and get in touch if you have any questions!
By giving the mind a task, we can begin to steady our thoughts and reduce feelings of anxiety. Try placing one hand on the chest, the other on the stomach. Close your eyes and focus on the rise and fall of the breath. If your sleep pattern is being affected by anxiety, then a mental health retreat could be a worthwhile investment. These expert-led programmes are designed to process thoughts and emotions, whilst providing the tools for self-development. Speak to Health Travel for more information on the best sleep programmes around the world.