Homeworking - ANOTHER ONS report!

ended 17. May 2021

On Monday (17th May) morning @ 09:30, the Office for National Statistics is publishing ANOTHER report on homeworking. This one's going to drill down into the detail and look at the prevalence of homeworking by industry, occupation, region, age, sex, ethnicity and local authority.

With this in mind, we want your views on, e.g.

  • Which sectors / industries are seeing the most homeworking (and may adopt it the most moving forward)?
  • Have certain areas of the country adopted homeworking more than others and, if so, why?
  • What demographic trends are you seeing in relation to homeworking?

As ever, be short and punchy in your alert_responses. Journalists want soundbites not War and Peace.

If you're a Premium user, your alert_responses will be edited to ensure they are as strong as possible and grammatically tight. Premium alert_responses also go to the top of the ViewsWire.

IMPORTANT: PLEASE ENSURE YOU SELECT AN EXPERT BEFORE YOU RESPOND AND THAT THE EXPERT HAS A PICTURE ATTACHED. OTHERWISE I WILL TEAR MY HAIR OUT (NOT THAT I HAVE MUCH LEFT).

 

1 responses from the Newspage community

"These latest homeworking figures highlight how the hybrid working genie is well and truly out of the bottle. "While Finance Directors are rubbing their hands with glee at the cost savings from dispensing with expensive serviced offices, hybrid working comes at a price, both social and economic. "Socially, hybrid working poses the inadvertent creation of ‘donut’ city centres, where businesses migrate to the fringes of cities as vast swathes of the workforce work from home. "SMEs reliant on commuter city centre footfall may therefore emerge as economic casualties of hybrid working. "At a business level, the hidden costs of hybrid working are yet to reveal themselves, such as IT support, reputational damage linked to data breaches and employee relations. "During lockdown we saw a spike in employees raising grievances, as managers wrestled with managing remotely. "With hybrid working set to become the enfant terrible of employee engagement, how companies balance the business case of this fundamental shift in working remains to be seen."