GCSE results day - your views wanted

ended 11. August 2021

Following A-level results yesterday, tomorrow is GCSE results day. We're looking for psychologists, therapists and mental health experts to give their views on how kids who don't get the results they want should cope with their disappointment - and also what their parents could do to help them. 2-3 sentences max please! We'll be issuing first thing in the morning.

If you're a Premium user, your response will be edited by an experienced news journalist to ensure it is as strong as possible and grammatically tight. 

3 responses from the Newspage community

"The 3 R’s are needed to support your child through disappointing results: 1. Remain in the present. Thoughts or conversations about how their results could have been different if X, Y or Z hadn't happened (no pandemic, exams were sat) are not helpful. Acknowledge with your child how difficult the current context has been and encourage acceptance of the present situation. Support them to speak to their teachers and explore their new options for the future. 2. Reassure your child - they are more than their results. Whichever way results go it is important that your child knows that you see all their strengths and skills and are proud of them for who they are. 3. Remember exam results are part of a wider transition process. Transitions (moving from an ending to a new beginning) bring opportunities as well as challenge. Don't get lost in focusing only on the event of opening results, there's a bigger picture too. For some, their next steps will go exactly as planned, for others they may need tweaking, but for all young people the future holds opportunities waiting to be taken. Ensure this positive hopeful future remains a reality."
"Try hard to hold back tears or anger if your child didn't get the grades they hoped for. Help them think logically of alternative paths. Plenty of successful people found success without great exam results."
"It’s devastating when you do not get the results you want, especially after you have worked so hard and coped with so much this past year and a half. Don’t be too hard on yourself, but be kind and compassionate. Recognise that this is not the end. You can pull your energies and focus on next year. Work out your next steps and what support you need to help you achieve the grades and goals you need going forward. Talk to your family and friends about your feelings of disappointment and any frustrations. Also talk about your plans. Parents need to be there to listen, offer encouragement and reassurance. Help your child understand that this is only one step in the journey and there will be many more opportunities out there."